Aims and Scope

The Open Nursing Journal is an Open Access online journal, which publishes research articles, reviews/mini-reviews, letters and guest edited thematic issues in all areas of nursing.


The Open Nursing Journal, a peer-reviewed journal, is an important and reliable source of current information on developments in the field. The emphasis will be on publishing quality papers rapidly and freely available to researchers worldwide.


We welcome papers related to nursing and midwifery, with specific relevance to health care practice, policy and research. We publish under the following themes:


  • Nursing and Midwifery practice
  • Education
  • Research methodology
  • Evidence based practice
  • New role in practice
  • Systematic reviews
  • Case studies
  • Ethical and professional issues
  • Management in health care
  • Sustainability in health and health care provision

All authors should make clear how the implications of their paper for nursing, midwifery and health care practice. They should also clearly identify the ‘take home message’ from their paper.


Recent Articles

Study of Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19) Outbreak in India

Vaishali Deshwal, Vimal Kumar

Background:

COVID-19 is an infectious disease caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). It has been recognized as a pandemic by the World Health Organization (WHO) on 11th March, 2020.

Objective:

To identify various factors that can increase coronavirus spread in India and predict COVID-19 cases up to 27th December, 2020, minimum and maximum number of deaths due to COVID-19 in India.

Methods:

This work predicts COVID-19 cases, the minimum and the maximum number of deaths due to COVID-19 in India based on the infection rate and suspected cases.

Results:

Our result shows that the number of COVID-19 cases will increase exponentially in India to approximately 859421415 cases by 27th December 2020.

Conclusion:

The spread of COVID-19 in India depends on a lot of factors such as religious congregation, social contact structure, low testing rates, identification of COVID-19 suspects, measures such as lockdown and sealing of hot stop, etc. taken by the Indian government. In India, lockdown proved to be a good decision.


March 22, 2021
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Editor's Choice

Night-time Noise Levels and Patients’ Sleep Experiences in a Medical Assessment Unit in Northern England

Felicity Astin, John Stephenson, Jonathan Wakefield, Ben Evans, Priyanka Rob, Garside Joanna, Emma Harris

Background:

Hospital in-patients need sleep so that restorative process and healing can take place. However, over one third of in-patients experience sleep disturbance, often caused by noise. This can compromise patients’ perceptions of care quality and cause physical and psychological ill health.

Aims:

To assess 1) in-patients sleep quality, quantity, reported sources of sleep disturbance and their suggestions for improvement 2) objectively measure decibel levels recorded at night.

Methods:

This descriptive study conducted in a Medical Assessment Unit used multi-methods; a semi-structured ‘sleep experience’ questionnaire administered to a purposive sample of in-patients; recording of night-time noise levels, on 52 consecutive nights, using two calibrated Casella sound level meters.

Results:

Patient ratings of ‘in-hospital’ sleep quantity (3.25; 2.72 SD) and quality (2.91; 2.56 SD) was poorer compared to ‘home’ sleep quantity (5.07; 2.81 SD) and quality (5.52; 2.79 SD). The difference in sleep quality (p<0.001) and quantity (p<0.001) ratings whilst in hospital, compared to at home, was statistically significant. Care processes, noise from other patients and the built environment were common sources of sleep disturbance. Participants’ suggestions for improvement were similar to interventions identified in current research. The constant noise level ranged from 38-57 decibels (equivalent to an office environment), whilst peak levels reached a maximum of 116 decibels, (equivalent to banging a car door one metre away).

Conclusion:

The self-rated patient sleep experience was significantly poorer in hospital, compared to home. Noise at night contributed to sleep disturbance. Decibel levels were equivalent to those reported in other international studies. Data informed the development of a ‘Sleep Smart’ toolkit designed to improve the in-patient sleep experience.


June 18, 2020
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