RESEARCH ARTICLE


Burden and Depression among Jordanian Caregivers of Hemodialysis Patients: A Cross-sectional Study



Eman Khamis Alnazly1, *
1 Department of Nursing Al-Ahliyya Amman University, Amman, 19328 Jordan


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Creative Commons License
© 2021 Eman Khamis Alnazly.

open-access license: This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Public License (CC-BY 4.0), a copy of which is available at: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/legalcode. This license permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

* Address correspondence to this author at Department of Nursing Al-Ahliyya Amman University, Amman, 19328 Jordan; Tel: +9 625-350-0211; Fax +9626-5336104; E-mail: emanalnazly@hotmail.com


Abstract

Introduction:

Caring for patients receiving hemodialysis places a burden on caregivers.

Objectives:

To examine caregiving burden and depression in the family caregivers of patients receiving hemodialysis and associated factors.

Methods:

A cross-sectional design was used. Participants were 204 adult caregivers of patients receiving hemodialysis. Questionnaires included sociodemographic characteristics, the Oberst Caregiving Burden Scale-Difficulty (OCBS-D) subscale, Bakas Caregiving Outcomes Scale (BCOS), and the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 to measure the burden and depression of caregivers. Descriptive statistics, two linear regression analyses, and multinomial logistic regression were used in data analysis.

Results:

The majority (59.0%, n = 120) of caregivers had a moderate level of depression with scores ranging from 11 to 16. The analysis showed that the mean score of OCBS-D was 42.0 (SD = 4.7) with scores ranging from 26.9 to 58.9 (range = 32.0), while the caregivers' mean score of BCOS was 52.1 (SD = 9.3) with scores ranging from 38.0 to 82.5 (range = 44.5). Given that the expected score of OCBS-D and BCOS ranged from 15 to 75 and 15 to 105, respectively, the analysis indicated a moderate to a high level of burden among caregivers. Age and travel time were associated with a higher likelihood of negative outcomes in the family caregivers, while higher patient age was associated with a greater caregiver burden.

Relevance to Clinical Practice:

It is important to assess and address the practical issues that caregivers experience, such as employment-related responsibilities, financial difficulties, and the need to learn specific skills related to patients’ chronic illnesses.

Conclusion:

Caregivers of patients receiving hemodialysis are likely to experience moderate depression and burden. Caregiver burden increases with patient age and travel time to the hemodialysis units.

Keywords: Burden, Caregiving, Depression, End-stage kidney disease, Hemodialysis, Family caregivers.