SYSTEMATIC REVIEW

Barriers to and Opportunities for Male Partner Involvement in Antenatal Care in Efforts to Eliminate Mother-to-child Transmission of Human Immunodeficiency Virus in Kenya: Systematic Review

The Open Nursing Journal 20 Nov 2020 SYSTEMATIC REVIEW DOI: 10.2174/1874434602014010232

Abstract

Introduction:

Men’s involvement in antenatal care (ANC) is intended to encourage husbands to support women’s care and associated interventions, including prevention of mother-to-child transmission from pregnancy to delivery, and throughout the postnatal period. The present study aimed to systematically review the barriers and opportunities for male partner involvement in antenatal care in efforts to eliminate mother-to-child transmission of Human Immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in Kenya.

Methods:

A systematic search of articles was from the following databases; Scopus, Science Direct, PUBMED, OVID, and Google scholar. The reference list of included studies was manually searched for possible additional eligible articles. The searches were conducted from May 2019 to April 2020. Qualitative analysis was done and data were presented in thematic domains.

Results:

The search generated 2208 articles, of which only 19 met the inclusion criteria. The major findings were discussed under two thematic domains: 1) Barriers: Knowledge, Social-cultural/economic factors, Institutional factors, and Age. 2) Opportunities: Skilled Birth Attendant, Human Immunodeficiency virus-free infant and Human Immunodeficiency virus testing.

Conclusion:

The review notes that the main barriers to male partner involvement in antenatal care in efforts to eliminate mother-to-child transmission of Human Immunodeficiency virus in Kenya include; socio-cultural factors, the low maternal-child health education by the male partner, and institutional factors. It further provides insight on the opportunities associated with male partner involvement in antenatal care/prevention of mother-to-child transmission, which includes; having Human Immunodeficiency virus-free infants and increased, skilled birth deliveries. The review strongly calls out for sustainable initiatives to incorporate males into the antenatal care/prevention of mother to child transmission programs.

Keywords: Child, Male, Humans, Female, Infectious disease, Transmission, Vertical, Kenya, Sexual partners, Human immunodeficiency virus infections.
Fulltext HTML PDF
1800
1801
1802
1803
1804