RESEARCH ARTICLE


Mindfulness Based Programs Implemented with At-Risk Adolescents



Kristen Rawlett*, Debra Scrandis
University of Maryland School of Nursing, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA


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© Rawlett and Scrandis; Licensee Bentham Open.

open-access license: This is an open access article licensed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial 4.0 International Public License (CC BY-NC 4.0) (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/legalcode), which permits unrestricted, non-commercial use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the work is properly cited.

* Address correspondence to this author at the University of Maryland School of Nursing, 655 West Lombard Street Room 675A, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA; Tel: 410-706-3906; Fax: 410-706-0253; Email: rawlett@son.umaryland.edu.


Abstract

Objective:

This review examines studies on mindfulness based programs used with adolescents at-risk for poor future outcomes such as not graduating from high school and living in poverty.

Method:

The keywords used include mindfulness, at-risk and adolescents in each database to search CINAHL (10 items: 2 book reviews, 3 Dissertations, and 5 research articles), Medline EBSCO (15 research articles), and PubMed (10 research articles). Only primary research articles published between 2009- 2015 in English on mindfulness and at-risk adolescents were included for the most current evidence.

Results:

Few studies (n= 11) were found that investigate mindfulness in at-risk adolescents. These studies used various mindfulness programs (n = 7) making it difficult to generalize findings for practice. Only three studies were randomized control trials focusing mostly on male students with low socioeconomic status and existing mental health diagnoses.

Conclusion:

There is a relationship between health behaviors and academic achievement. Future research studies on mindfulness based interventions need to expand to its effects on academic achievement in those youth at-risk to decrease problematic behaviors and improve their ability to be successful adults.

Keywords: Age 10-19, academic achievement, at-risk adolescents, interventions, mindfulness based programs, review.